INTERNATIONAL WEBINAR ON SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING

INTERNATIONAL WEBINAR ON SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING

Room “A. Rizzo”, 28 September 2018, time 19.00 - 20.00 (CET)

The speakers are connected by CONNECT platform in remote way and broadcasted in Brindisi and other ERN-APULIA cities.

E' NECESSARIA LA PRENOTAZIONE

PER TUTTI GLI EVENTI SU PRENOTAZIONE E' CONSIGLIATA LA REGISTRAZIONE CHE VA EFFETTUATA INVIANDO LA RICHIESTA AL SEGUENTE INDIRIZZO MAIL:

ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING

19.00 - 20.00 Session Chair: Dr. Michele Penza - Head of Laboratory
ENEA, Department for Sustainability, Brindisi, Italy

19.00 - 19.10

Dr. Ron Williams

US EPA Chief Scientist NERL - National Exposure Research Laboratory, Office of Research and Development, Research Triangle Park, Durham, North Carolina, USA

The US EPA's Air Sensor Research Program

19.00 - 19.10

19.10 - 19.20

Dr. Kristen Benedict

US EPA Senior Scientist NERL - National Exposure Research Laboratory, Office of Research and Development, Research Triangle Park, Durham, North Carolina, USA
Air Sensors and Citizen Science - A Perspective from The U.S. EPA

19.20 - 19.30

Dr. Andrea Polidori

Atmospheric Measurements Manager
South Coast Air Quality Management District, Diamond Bar, California, USA
Overview of SCAQMD’s Advanced Air Monitoring Program

19.20 - 19.30

19.30 - 19.40

Dr. Luisella Ciancarella

Head of Laboratory
ENEA, Department for Sustainability, Bologna, Italy
Air Pollution Modelling and Support to Related Policies in Italy

19.40 - 19.50

Dr. Giandomenico Pace

Senior Scientist
ENEA, Department for Sustainability, Roma, Italy
The ENEA Station for Climate Observations of Lampedusa: an Integrated Observatory in the Mediterranean Sea

19.40 - 19.50

19.50 - 20.00

Questions and Answers to the speakers from audience

Dr. Ron Williams
Dr. Ron Williams19.00 - 19.10
US EPA Chief Scientist NERL - National Exposure Research Laboratory, Office of Research and Development, Research Triangle Park, Durham, North Carolina, USA

Biography

Ron Williams is an Air and Energy (A-E) Project Co-Lead with the US Environmental Protection Agency’s Office of Research and Development. This work involves integrating the efforts involving a team of chemists, engineers, exposure scientists, and other researchers in advanced environmental monitoring techniques. Having more than 38 years of experience in conducting environmental research at the private, academic and governmental levels, he is a recognized expert in exposure monitoring and has been responsible for designing, executing and summarizing some of the US EPA's most comprehensive studies. He has published over 200 peer reviewed articles or technical reports in support of the Agency’s goals. His current research focuses on developing and evaluating emerging sensor technology and determining its applicability for meeting a wide variety of air quality monitoring needs.

The US EPA's Air Sensor Research Program

Abstract

The mission of the EPA is to protect human health and the environment. In addressing health risks, the goal is to not only provide protection for the general population, but specifically for vulnerable individuals and groups. EPA is actively supporting community-based citizen science projects and responding to requests for information and guidance on air pollution monitoring. The Air Sensor Toolbox for Citizen Scientists was developed as a resource to meet stakeholder needs. Examples of materials developed for the Toolbox and pilot tested in communities are presented.

Biography

Kristen Benedict is an air sensors policy advisor and team lead in the Office of Air Quality Planning and Standards (OAQPS) at the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Her role is to stay abreast of emerging measurement and information technologies both domestically and internationally. She leads a team of experts across disciplines including ambient and source measurement, health science, permitting, data collection and display, and outreach. She also serves on a joint EPA/State advanced monitoring team focused on the appropriate understanding, collection, and use of data generated by new devices. Kristen received her Bachelor’s degree from the University of Virginia (UVA) in Environmental Science and a Master’s degree from North Carolina State University (N.C. State) in Atmospheric Science.

Air Sensors and Citizen Science - A Perspective from The U.S. EPA

Abstract

The technology around lower cost air sensors is rapidly advancing, as are the deployments of these sensors throughout communities in the United States (U.S.). This presentation will provide a perspective on projects collecting large volumes of unique air quality data including how the collection of big data fits into the overall picture of air quality management and characterization. Data quality, interpretation, and management needs will be addressed as well as initiatives and programs aimed to promote a more systematic characterization of non-regulatory air sensor measurements.

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Dr. Kristen Benedict
Dr. Kristen Benedict19.10 - 19.20
US EPA Senior Scientist NERL - National Exposure Research Laboratory, Office of Research and Development, Research Triangle Park, Durham, North Carolina, USA
Dr. Andrea Polidori
Dr. Andrea Polidori19.20 - 19.30
South Coast Air Quality Management District, California, USA Atmospheric Measurements Manager 21865 Copley Drive, Diamond Bar, CA 91765

Biography

Andrea Polidori is the Atmospheric Measurements Manager at the South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD) in the Science and Technology Advancement Division. His primary responsibilities include the overall management of all SCAQMD ambient air monitoring network operations, special monitoring programs, and related projects. He has been leading the design, development and implementation of the Air Quality Sensor Performance Evaluation Center (AQ-SPEC), a program created to conduct comprehensive performance tests of commercially available, low-cost air quality sensors. He is also in charge of SCAQMD's fenceline monitoring program, which was created to demonstrate the capabilities of optical remote sensing technologies for measuring refinery and other industrial emissions. Prior to joining the SCAQMD, he was a Research Assistant Professor at the University of Southern California, Los Angeles where he taught courses and conducted extensive research on the relationships between indoor and outdoor air pollutants, and the health impacts caused by exposure to air toxics.

Overview of SCAQMD’s Advanced Air Monitoring Program

Abstract

In this presentation an overview of SCAQMD’s Advanced Air Monitoring Program will be provided. Activities of the Air Quality Sensor Performance Evaluation Center (AQ-SPEC), a program conducting comprehensive performance evaluations of low-cost air quality sensors will be described. A summary of the SCAQMD's fenceline monitoring program, which utilizes optical remote sensing technologies for measuring refinery and other industrial emissions, will also be given. Finally, a perspective on how these data can inform effective policy decisions and assist with fulfilling the requirements of the most recent SCAQMD rules and California legislations will be discussed. Throughout this presentation I will also talk about the evolution of my professional career and the journey that brought me from a very small town in Italy (Urbino) to one of the largest metropolitan areas in the world (Los Angeles, USA).

Biography

Luisella Ciancarella is a physicist and head of ENEA Atmospheric Pollution Laboratory from 2010. She developed specific experience on integrated modelling tools concerning atmospheric pollution for current and future scenario analysis, using the most appropriate emissions inventories. She worked with environmental impact assessment and cost-effectiveness analyses models to identify strategies and specific policies for short and long-term environmental sustainability and to support decision making process.

From 2012 onwards, she has been scientific manager of several Collaboration Agreements with the Italian Ministry of Environment and of national Projects to develop applications of ENEA Atmospheric Modelling Systems and GAINS Italy Integrated Assessment Model which had become, in the meantime, national reference models as MINNI (National Integrated Model to support the international negotiation on atmospheric pollution).

The Projects concerned, in particular, air quality impact assessment of great national point emission sources and atmospheric pollution health impact assessments both for specific and total national sources.

On behalf of the Italian Ministry of Environment, many activities were developed in scenario mode, feeding air quality model simulations with emission scenarios developed with GAINS Italy for target years (for Gothenburg Protocol and New Emission Ceiling Directive). In this context, integration with Regional Climate Model is pursued to obtain a climatic forcing for scenario years as 2050.

On these issues, she is the author of more than twenty articles in international peer-reviewed journals and around ten publications on international conference proceedings.

Air Pollution Modelling and Support to Related Policies in Italy

Abstract

With three consecutive Agreements, between 2002 and 2012, the Italian Ministry of Environment funded the MINNI (National Integrated Model to support the international negotiation on atmospheric pollution) system development which was applied in several areas.

The MINNI modeling system is made of a physical-chemical module (AMS, Atmospheric Modeling System), describing emission, transport and chemical reactions of atmospheric pollutants, and an emission technology and pollution impact module (GAINS-Italy), supporting evaluation of abatement potentials, costs and impacts of emission reduction strategies.

The most relevant role for a National Air Quality Model is the support to the International and European negotiation processes leading to Protocols and Directives on air pollution and the support to measures and national planning tool aiming to the compliance with limit values and target values.

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Dr. Luisella Ciancarella
Dr. Luisella Ciancarella19.30 - 19.40
Head of Laboratory ENEA, Department for Sustainability, Bologna, Italy
Dr. Giandomenico Pace
Dr. Giandomenico Pace19.40 - 19.50
Senior Scientist ENEA, Department for Sustainability, Roma, Italy

Biography

Giandomenico Pace holds a degree in Physics and a Ph.D. in Remote Sensing at the University of Rome “La Sapienza”. He had postdoc positions at the Remote Sensing Laboratory of the University of Rome, at the Earth Observation Program Development Department of the European Space Agency (The Netherlands), and at the Laboratory of Experimental Studies on Climate of ENEA.

He joined ENEA in 2005 with a permanent position; from 2005 to 2010 he worked at the Air Quality Laboratory of Bologna, on the development and validation of the atmospheric component of the National Integrated Model to support the International Negotiation on atmospheric pollution (MINNI).

In 2010 he moved to the ENEA Laboratory of Observations and Analysis of Earth and Climate, where his main research activities are devoted to studies concerning the aerosol-cloud interactions and radiative effects using microwave, infrared and visible radiation measurements at Lampedusa (Mediterranean) and Thule Air Base (Greenland).

The ENEA Station for Climate Observations of Lampedusa: an Integrated Observatory in the Mediterranean Sea

Abstract

The ENEA Station for Climate Observations on the island of Lampedusa is a research facility in the Mediterranean dedicated to the measurements of the climatic parameters (http://www.lampedusa.enea.it/).

Lampedusa is a small rocky island relatively far from continents and pollution sources. Due to its geographic characteristics Lampedusa is a good site for satellite data validation, for study of aerosol and greenhouse gases background distribution and long-range transport, and for the radiation budget investigation in the Mediterranean.

The presentation will show and discuss the results of some studies carried out since 1997 providing hints of future researches planned at the Station.